Fahrenheit 451 annotations

Fahrenheit Annotated Bibliography Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit is analysis of what society could be if we let totalitarianism and censorship run our society. Bradbury wrote Fahrenheit in a time where totalitarian, communist governments were springing up everywhere, he uses Clara, the book burning by the government, and his wife as a representation of what society could become if the totalitarian communist let us all become single-minded drones. Annotation Rubinstein, William D.

Fahrenheit 451 annotations

However, firemen have been given a new occupation; they are burners of books and the official censors of the state. As a fireman, Guy Montag is Fahrenheit 451 annotations for destroying not only the books he finds, but also the homes in which he finds them. Books are not to be read; they are to be destroyed without question.

For Montag, "It was a pleasure to burn. Therefore, Montag, along with the other firemen, burn the books to show conformity. Without ideas, everyone conforms, and as a result, everyone should be happy.

Fahrenheit 451 annotations

When books and new ideas are available to people, conflict and unhappiness occur. At first, Montag believes that Fahrenheit 451 annotations is happy. When he views himself in the firehouse mirror after a night of burning, he grins "the fierce grin of all men singed and driven back by flame.

When Montag meets Clarisse McClellan, his new vivacious teenage neighbor, he begins to question whether he really is happy. Clarisse gives Montag enlightenment; she questions him not only about his own personal happiness but also about his occupation and about the fact that he knows little truth about history.

At the same time, she also gives the reader the opportunity to see that the government has dramatically changed what its citizens perceive as their history. For example, Montag never knew that firemen used to fight actual fires or that billboards used to be only 20 feet long.

Nor did Montag know that people could actually talk to one another; the governmental use of parlor walls has eliminated the need for casual conversation.

Clarisse arouses Montag's curiosity and begins to help him discover that real happiness has been missing from his life for quite some time. After Montag's encounter with Clarisse, he returns home to find his wife Mildred Montag Millie unconscious; she is lying on the bed with her Seashell Radios in her ears and has overdosed on tranquilizers and sleeping pills.

Two impersonal technicians, who bring machines to pump her stomach and provide a total transfusion, save Millie, but she could possibly overdose again and never even know it — or so it may seem.

The matter of the overdose — whether an attempted suicide or a result of sheer mindlessness — is never settled. Although Montag wishes to discuss the matter of the overdose, Millie does not, and their inability to agree on even this matter suggests the profound estrangement that exists between them.

Even though Montag and Millie have been married for years, Montag realizes, after the overdose incident, that he doesn't really know much about his wife at all.

He can't remember when or where he first met her. In fact, all that he does know about his wife is that she is interested only in her "family" — the illusory images on her three-wall TV — and the fact that she drives their car with high-speed abandon.

He realizes that their life together is meaningless and purposeless. They don't love each other; in fact, they probably don't love anything, except perhaps burning Montag and living secondhand through an imaginary family Millie.

When Montag returns to work the next day, he touches the Mechanical Hound and hears a growl. The Mechanical Hound is best described as a device of terror, a machine that is perversely similar to a trained killer dog but has been improved by refined technology, which allows it to inexorably track down and capture criminals by stunning them with a tranquilizer.

Montag fears that the dog can sense his growing unhappiness. He also fears that the Hound somehow knows that he's confiscated some books during one of his raids.Fahrenheit is currently Bradbury's most famous written work of social criticism.

It deals with serious problems of control of the masses by the media, the banning of books, and the suppression of the mind (with censorship). Fahrenheit by Ray Bradbury. Important Quotes with Page Numbers.

These important quotes from the novel reveal themes, character development or symbols used by Bradbury. Page numbers here and throughout this study guide refer to the Simon & Schuster Paperbacks edition. From a general summary to chapter summaries to explanations of famous quotes, the SparkNotes Fahrenheit Study Guide has everything you need to ace quizzes, tests, and essays.

Ray Bradbury

Fahrenheit is currently Bradbury's most famous written work of social criticism. It deals with serious problems of control of the masses by the media, the banning of books, and the suppression of the mind (with censorship). "Fahrenheit " Bradbury chose this as the title of the book because this is the degree that books burn at.

Fahrenheit 451 annotations

When you burn books, you burn knowledge and wisdom. From a general summary to chapter summaries to explanations of famous quotes, the SparkNotes Fahrenheit Study Guide has everything you need to ace quizzes, tests, and essays.

SparkNotes: Fahrenheit