Writing process posters

What exactly is a poster presentation? A poster presentation combines text and graphics to present your project in a way that is visually interesting and accessible. It allows you to display your work to a large group of other scholars and to talk to and receive feedback from interested viewers.

Writing process posters

What exactly is a poster presentation? A poster presentation combines text and graphics to present your project in a way that is visually interesting and accessible. It allows you to display your work to a large group of other scholars and to talk to and receive feedback from interested viewers.

Poster sessions have been very common in the sciences for some time, and they have recently become more popular as forums for the presentation of research in other disciplines like the social sciences, service learning, the humanities, and the arts. Poster presentation formats differ from discipline to discipline, but in every case, a poster should clearly articulate what you did, how you did it, why you did it, and what it contributes to your field and the larger field of human knowledge.

What goals should I keep in mind as I construct my poster? You will need to decide on a small number of key points that you want your viewers to take away from your presentation, and you will need to articulate those ideas clearly and concisely.

Visual interest and accessiblity. Who will be viewing my poster? The answer to this question depends upon the context in which you will be presenting your poster.

Writing process posters

If you are presenting at a conference in your field, your audience will likely contain mostly people who will be familiar with the basic concepts you're working with, field-specific terminology, and the main debates facing your field and informing your research. This type of audience will probably most interested in clear, specific accounts of the what and the how of your project.

If you are presenting in a setting where some audience members may not be as familiar with your area of study, you will need to explain more about the specific debates that are current in your field and to define any technical terms you use.

This audience will be less interested in the specific details and more interested in the what and why of your project—that is, your broader motivations for the project and its impact on their own lives. How do I narrow my project and choose what to put on my poster?

Probably less than you would like! One of the biggest pitfalls of poster presentations is filling your poster with so much text that it overwhelms your viewers and makes it difficult for them to tell which points are the most important.

Viewers should be able to skim the poster from several feet away and easily make out the most significant points. The point of a poster is not to list every detail of your project. Rather, it should explain the value of your research project.

To do this effectively, you will need to determine your take-home message. What is the single most important thing you want your audience to understand, believe, accept, or do after they see your poster?

Once you have an idea about what that take-home message is, support it by adding some details about what you did as part of your research, how you did it, why you did it, and what it contributes to your field and the larger field of human knowledge.

What kind of information should I include about what I did? This is the raw material of your research: In the sciences, the what of a project is often divided into its hypothesis and its data or results.

In other disciplines, the what is made up of a claim or thesis statement and the evidence used to back it up. Choose a few key pieces of evidence that most clearly illustrate your take-home message. Often a chart, graph, table, photo, or other figure can help you distill this information and communicate it quickly and easily.

What kind of information should I include about how I did it? Include information about the process you followed as you conducted your project. Viewers will not have time to wade through too many technical details, so only your general approach is needed.Help your little ones to write some fantastic stories with this colourful Writing Process poster, stick up around your classroom for a handy aid during independent writing activities.

We love the Teacher Trap's writing wall! You can get her Writing Workshop resource that includes these writing process printable posters, detailed lesson plans, conference guide, planner, rubrics and more {grades } using the link in our bio!

I can't wait to fill my classroom walls with posters. This is a great poster to have in the classroom, to remind students of the writing process, and it could also double as a clip chart, and track where the students are during the writing process.

Complete set of black and white dot theme writing process posters perfect for elementary education.

Small Creative Writing Poster

The wording is simple enough for lower grades, while also appropriate for upper-elementary students. Sep 18,  · A series of classroom posters of a five step writing process: plan, draft, review, edit/proofread, publish.

There’s plenty out there, but as always I didn’t like the design at all. As always, the images are from Google Images. I believe when I made these, I based them on the writing process .

Writing process posters

Product Features One poster illustrates proofreading tools, the other shows the writing process.

Writing Process - BrainPOP